All posts tagged doing good

Dhatur Sirin Tamang live with their children and relatives in a compound of 12 houses. Only one is livable now. Photo Credit: Emily Troutman

Sparking Our Interest: Nepal Relief, Big Money and Beating Hunger

06/22/2015

We’re planning to regularly share stories with you that pique our interest. Here are a few that stood out to us this week:

Who’s Getting the Aid Money in Nepal?

Journalist Emily Troutman is continuing her work in aid transparency. She recently found that less than one percent of the UN’s Flash Appeal for the Nepal Earthquake went to organizations based in the South Asian country. Read more…

Your Letters: Aid Ethics and Business v. Philanthropy

We’d like to share some letters we’ve been receiving from listeners like you. The first is from someone seeking advice on an ethical issue. Read more…

Tracking the Aid Money: Mission Impossible

After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the more recent Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone, billions of foreign aid dollars flowed into those countries. But figuring out how that money was spent has been enormously frustrating our two guests.

Read more…

A Global Detour Before College

Graduation season is here, but not all high school seniors are taking the direct route to college. In recent years, some 350 seniors have chosen to put higher education on hold for Global Citizen Year, which offers them year-long apprenticeships in Africa and Latin America. Read more…

Not If, But When: Planning for the Next Nepal

The 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal was the nation’s worst in some 80 years. International aid groups are rushing to help more than a million people get food and other forms of relief.

But our guest Brian Tucker says responding to crises in this way is shortsighted, costly and just poor policy. Read more…

Why Philanthropy Should Push Back Against the Business Mindset

Giving more money to altruistic initiatives should make those programs stronger, right? Not necessarily. Even some of the most well-known, well-intentioned programs have fallen short of their promises, especially ones funded on hunches instead of data. Read more…

n the yellow helmet and socks, I take on my first men's race in Ontario, California, on March 22, 2015. Photo by Billy Cordero.

Finding the Good in a Bad Crash

By Amy Ta

This podcast is about doing good. But bad thoughts have been hampering me since March 22, 2015. That was the day I smashed face-first onto pavement during a criterium bike race in Ontario, California. Read more…

Spring Cleaning? Before You Donate It…


It’s spring here in the US, so for many that means it’s time for the “big clean”. We dig into our closets, find a pile of tired clothes, and dump them at the Salvation Army or Goodwill. Maybe Oxfam if you’re in London.

Read more…

Journalist Questions Her Paycheck After Aid Scandal

Update: After we posted this podcast, a Washington Post investigation revealed that International Relief and Development had billed the US government $1.1 million for posh staff parties and retreats. Read more…

Charities: Flattering Reports, Poor Data

Nonprofit advisor Caroline Fiennes has a lot to say about how we assess charities. She used to run one herself. Back then, Fiennes would try to figure out whether her organization was achieving its goals but admits she wasn’t always forthcoming about the findings. “When the results were good, we would share them,” she tells us. “And when they weren’t, we didn’t.” Read more…